SMECO newsletter

volume 66 - issue 1 - january 2016

How weather affects bills

Snow in Southern Maryland

Your bill this January is probably not as high as it was in January 2015. These lower bills are thanks to lower power cost and the moderate weather (at times spring-like weather) in December. When temperatures are not too warm or too cold, the heating and cooling system in your home doesn't need to work hard to keep your home comfortable. Heating and cooling are typically the biggest reason for increased energy use in the home and the more energy you use, the higher your bill will be. Weather has a direct impact on your electric usage and bill.

For example, in February 2015, 38 percent of SMECO’s residential customers used more than 2,000 kWh when the average temperature was 27.3°F. In October 2015, only 4 percent of SMECO’s customers used more than 2,000 kWh when the average temperature was 57.5°F.

While the El Niño kept December temperatures higher than average in Southern Maryland, there is still a chance for true winter weather to descend. If we experience colder weather in January and February and those heating systems have to start working hard again, expect your energy usage to increase along with your electric bill.